HRV, Simple Games & Imagination

After feedback from Bob and Gwern on the learning post I have started collecting heart rate variability (HRV) while playing Dual-N-Back game that Gwern recommended. Dual-N-Back is much more intense than the simple category recognition game I have been measuring. I will share the results there when I gave a good amount of data. Out of curiousity I kept playing the simple game from the first post and continued recording the results.

What I have seen with continued plays of that first simple game has surprised me. According to the principles in Csikszentmihalyi’s Flow I would expect a stress response from my HRV reading in the beginning, a relaxed (high) HRV when I was in Flow then for the reading to taper off as I become bored with the task. I’m not finding that. Here is the graph:

Slide1

What has happened is after the first sessions of learning how to use the category game (session 1 through 6) my HRV became relaxed and has stayed there. In fact the “up-down-up-down” you see on the graph is an expression of the fact I do two or three sessions a day and sometimes I get into a groove in different sessions. The graph if you average the sessions across the day eliminates this and is clearer on how stable my HRV has been once I familiarized myself with the game:

Slide2

So this particular category game engages my attention enough to get me into a relaxed state that yields consistently higher HRV. I am a bit thoughtful during the task and at times my mind wanders because I am bored. And the numbers show that I am averaging a much higher HRV overall after having become familiar with the task.

What I see in the different session scores is a state of attention playing out. When I am engaged and focus my HRV as reflected in the points scores is higher. Each time I play I use the same tablet at the same desk in the same sound and light environment. The task is the same, and I usually score the same amount of points. What is different is whether I have a story in my head that I should be doing something else or have been doing the task for too long. That story is completely from my imagination. So imagination drives HRV as much as anything.

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