Monthly Archives: January 2015

How Meetings Go – Physiologically

I have been measuring my rMSSD during work meetings to see what factors impact my performance when engaging face to face with others. I recently had two meetings with the same group of people on the same topic about a week apart. Before each meeting I also took my blood sugar to see if there was any information to be gleaned there. Here are the charts:

Slide1My blood sugar was abnormally high at 135 before the first meeting. I can’t account for it as I had salmon for lunch two hours before. My average rMSSD was much lower at 28.7 which is a reading of high stress. My stress point for rMSSD is 48, when I am below that reading it is an indicator that I am in stress. My experience during the meeting was of being overly excited and I breathed regularly during the meeting.

During the second meeting I was careful about my food choices for the day and had a good blood glucose level of 105. My average rMSSD for the meeting was higher at 38.8. I felt more in the zone in the second meeting physiologically. We were digging into more details in the second meeting and I felt challenged at a few points, and you can see where the reading drops to a very low rMSSD at a few points.

If asked I would have said the first meeting was more successful based on the discussion. And I would have said the second meeting was more challenging. However physiologically the second meeting was far less stressful than the first. When less stressed I imagine my actual performance was better. So my perception of the outcome was very different than the physiological reality.

Next step is to measure outcomes and see if the results correlate with the physiological state occurring during the meetings. I can’t rely on my perception of the situation so further readings will determine outcomes with physiology.

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My Quantified Self Lessons Learned in 2014

I started the year wanting to explore how I could use technology to understand when stress was or was not occurring. I was interested in if self reported stress was reliable and if there were techniques I could practice that would reverse stress in increasingly shorter periods.

Looking for technology that could help identify when I was stressed was an exercise in buying a lot of technology and trying to find anything that would actually work. I looked at galvanic skin response, different watch iterations and ended up settling on heart rate variability (HRV) as a way to understand when I was relaxed or stressed.

As I began looking at different states of stress using HRV I measured myself while meditating, getting a tooth drilled at dentist, while giving a public speech, and getting a haircut. Each of these gave me the range of when I was stressed and not and gave me a baseline for further studies. I think the takeaway here is the boring baseline building work is necessary for real insight.

I learned that when it came to returning to poise from a state of upset, I could improve with practice and that a key technique was respiration. The ability breath well, which takes a bit of practice, was the key to busting stress. So stress, like fitness, was a state that could be altered with progressive practice. That was my assumption at the beginning of the work.

What was less obvious was how much thought and belief plays a part in how much stress I experience. Early on during my self reporting studies I found that a surprisingly high percentage of stress was self induced. Most stress was due to a discrepancy between what I thought was proper and what what happening. Even deeper, I found that my reactions were not complex reactions, but that emotion is navigation. Whether I was feeling in the right location or out of place determined whether I was calm or stressed.

I thought I could use technology to measure stress then solve for it through techniques, but that model turned out to be incorrect. It turns out my thoughts drove a stream of stressful reactions (or not) and that knowing when I am in a state of stress or not helped me change the underlying construct. And that is what takes me into the new year.

My Quantified Self Gear 2014

I have steered clear of reviewing products because I think simply buying products has very little to do with Quantified Self. And I thought it good for me to review what I used and how useful some of it was. My premise for my QS work in 2014 was to use technology to train myself to be happier.  I had used several Garmin products to successfully train for a half Ironman. Why couldn’t I train myself to be happier?

I pulled everything out of my wearables storage drawer and took this photo of everything I bought in 2014:

QSGear

The items:

I started with a Pebble smartwatch that my wife had given to me as a birthday gift. $99 from the original Kickstarter campaign. I love it and still use it daily with one app called Motiv8 that tracks activity.

Google Glass. What can I say. I fancied myself as an Explorer with $1500 burning a hole in my pocket. I once looked up the population of the state of New Jersey on it and sent my son an email saying “Hi this is my talking to my Google Glass.” That about sums it up. It has not been charged up for about 8 months now. It was so deep in the drawer it did not make the picture above and I just now remembered having it. Enough said.

Zensorium’s Tinke. Billing itself as a stress and fitness measurement device, I purchased one at the Quantified Self Europe conference in Amsterdam for over $100. Its readings made no sense to me and it went into the drawer pretty quickly.

Heartmath’s emWave2 & emWave Pro. This was over $400 worth of gear and if you follow this blog or my QS speeches at all I did get a lot of use out of both products. I conducted multiple experiments and accrued 183,843 “coherence points” – which is quite a few hours of cardiac coherence. In the end I grew out of it as coherence was not my ultimate goal. I think this product is way overpriced and was useful.

Neurosky Mindwave & Mindwave Mobile. Over $200 in cost, I could never get either headset to work consistently. I took some readings but any attempt to get the devices to reliably produce output was frustrated by bluetooth connectivity issues  of some sort. A big disappointment from Neurosky.

Emfit sleep monitor. I met the Emfit team at the QS EU conference and they helpfully offered me a free trial of their product. A combination of wireless connectivity issues and my move from London to San Francisco resulted in my never getting it working.

Mio heart rate band. Very slick implementation and a comfortable wrist band that uses pulse oximetry. I loved the idea, and it was not useful for heart rate variability experiments. The accuracy was not good enough so into the drawer it went. I paid over $100 for it.

After visiting with a friend who worked at Basis I dutifully bought the first version of the watch for around $150. I liked a lot of the ideas but did not really take to the interface or the gamification element of the online account. By the time I bought it I had eliminated pulse oximetry as reliable source of heart rate data. I gave it to a friend and he likes it.

Fitbit flex. I ended up buying two for $99 each because the first one gave out and stopped charging. The second one was spotty on charging as well. I used the product for 10 months and got a lot of value from it. In the end, the inability to charge it and a policy change that eliminated active minutes as a goal had me put it in the drawer. I replaced it with the $79 Garmin Vivofit because I do like to monitor my daily activity. So far that seems to be working out.

Sweetbeatlife & the VitalConnect Patch. Sweetbeat Life is an app that takes heart rate data from either a belt or the VitalConnect Patch. The patch seemed novel as it was convenient and comfortable. And it did not stay adhered on my chest for more than a few sessions. It was a breathtaking $199 for a set of 10 patches. I did not understand the real cost until the first patch fell off after the second use. Really cool and really expensive. I went back to the old reliable Polar H7 heart rate belt for a nice price of $80.  And one belt will last the whole year.

One thing that is not clearly stated is that you need top end smartphones to use apps associate with all this hardware. Neurosky, Fitbit, VitalConnect Patch and even my much loved Pebble need a phone with Bluetooth LE. I had an older version Android phone without Bluetooth LE so I needed to buy an iPod5 for iOS only apps and devices $199. And for Android I had to buy another device with LE so I bought a Nexus 7 tablet for $245.

So a quick add up gives me approximately $3,500 worth of gear of which 42% of that is the Google Glass. What did that expenditure do for me? It taught me through brute force that picking an area of Quantified Self to study and focussing there is 90% wikipedia work and networking with other people who have knowledge. 10% is hardware. And ultimately the majority of value came from about $500 worth of the gear I bought (Heartmath Pro, Polar H7, iPod5). The rest helped me understand some things but were not good value for money. For the Quantified Self, as in life, money cannot buy you happiness.