Testing the Parasympathetic Flatline

Last week I proposed measuring a Parasympathetic Flatline (PS Flatline) where at least ten successive heart beat intervals were close together. This differs from using 30 second averages for rMSSD, a time based measure of average intervals. I wanted to to a side by side comparison to see which of these methods more accurately could point me to moments when I triggered a shutdown of my Parasympathetic Nervous System which allowed the fight or flight reaction to run things.

I measured several meetings where I was able to audio record the proceedings while measuring my heart rate. I used my Android phone to record the audio, a Polar H7 heart rate belt to pick up my heart rate and Marco Altini’s Heart Rate Variability Logger to capture the data. Afterward, I downloaded the csv files for both the rr intervals and the 30 second rMSSD.

The meeting was 55 minutes long and included one person in the room with me and one person on the phone. We were discussing a topic I was comfortable with and an activity I had experience doing. I was briefing my colleagues on a time schedule and details. I was in a relaxed state going into the meeting and did a short two minute breathing reset using BreatheSync prior to the meeting.

In previous studies I had determined that a 30 second rMSSD under 48 was probably a stress state. I had used several stress events to create this baseline. When looking at this meeting, however, I was disappointed to see that using this method definitely overstated the number of stress states. The graph below shows blue bars where I had a 30 second rMSSD under 48 and you can see it shows I was in that state for much of the meeting.

Slide1

This was not my experience of the meeting. I had the facts to hand, we had a good discussion and overall it was a friendly, informative discussion. So the 30 second rMSSD had not done the job for this meeting. I then looked at the PS Flatline that would show when my beat to beat intervals were less than 17 milliseconds for 10 consecutive beats. Here is what the meeting looked like using the PS Flatline.

Slide2

Listening to the audio I could definitely see that this method caught moments that had me shifting into high gear. I chose this meeting because there was a point at the fifteen minute mark where my information was completely wrong and I felt the flush of embarrassment. This came through accurately in the chart. It also showed several moments where I was trying to calculate sums with an audience and I needed to shift into gear and focus. You can see on the chart different elements of the meeting I heard in the audio and my memory of what was happening.

So the PS Flatline approach seems to be much more accurate though I have to do further analysis on other meetings to ensure it is catching all of the stress trigger events. I have 10 additional meetings recorded with audio and HRV so i will start crunching those number next.

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