Superpower Series: Why You Should Memorize Your Speeches

One superpower that some people seem to have mastered is the ability to stand in front of a group of people and give a speech. For most people it is the most stressful of events, up there with losing a job and divorce. So how can you use Heart Rate Variability (HRV) to keep your fight or flight mode from kicking in and you entering a panic state in front of the group?

Well, it does not appear you can avoid the fight or flight response standing in front of a group of people. From measurements I have taken when speaking I think that the only strategy you can employ is to have more material embedded in memory so you just speak automatically without having the engage your prefontal cortex.

The mechanics of this are straightforward. When you are in fight/flight your body optimizes blood flow to get you out of danger. Blood flows to your limbs and the back of your brain, allowing you to maximize your ability to react. When you are in this reaction mode your thinking brain is offline. You can’t wing it when your thinking brain is offline.

I took readings while speaking at two different Quantified Self meetups. This is a very sympathetic crowd. There is no pressure to perform for this crown. And I have experience speaking publicly, from corporate engagements to speaking competitions for Toastmasters. I enjoy public speaking, so I should be on the more relaxed end of the spectrum. The data shows that even experienced speakers are not immune to the stress of presenting to groups.

As a baseline for compare readings from a meeting with senior people that I am working for as I presented in an earlier post. This was a high intensity meeting where I was expected to present information. The graph shows with blue bars where I experienced the fight/flight impulse.


Slide4
Readings on a speech I did at the meetup July 28th of 2014 showed how much stress the system kicks in when on a stage. I started the measurement about five minutes before the speech and did some breathing exercises to see if that would have an effect on my measurements. Here is me giving the speech.

Qs Speech

The breathing exercises did help kick in my relaxation response for the first five minutes of the reading. Once I got to the podium, however, the fight/flight kicked in. I spoke for 14 minutes and answered questions for ten minutes. You can see the readings in this graph: The red box shows the period in which the speaking portion of the presentation took place.

Slide1

A second speech showed a similar pattern. In March of 2015 I spoke again at a Quantified Self meetup to a smaller group. Again a very sympathetic group. I knew the material and was pleased to be presenting. This was a shorter speech, five minutes speaking and five minutes of Q&A. You can see from the chart and the red box that the during speaking portion I was almost entirely in fight/flight state.

Slide2

Why this is important is  as described above the pre-frontal cortex is offline when in this state. Meaning that you can’t think through what you are going to say in real time when you are on the podium. You are in reaction mode. So rehearse the material. When a slide comes up, you react to what you have memorized. I have had experience of “watching” myself giving a speech when I have memorized the material and am bouncing along well. And I have had the experience of freezing in place when I had nothing in my deep memory to react to. And I just stared blankly at the audience.

So memorize your material before you get up to speak. Your physiology will ensure your brain is offline. If you react well throughout the speech you will give a great speech. Even this guy had to memorize his speech:

Braveheart

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