Category Archives: Glucose

Water Fast Yields Ketosis And Halitosis

I am a regular listener and a fan of Damien Blenkensopp’s The Quantified Body podcast. He podcasted excellent coverage and reportage of his five day water fast so I decided to try it and report back to compare and contrast my experience.

Before the fast I was intimidated by the idea of doing it. Despite hearing evidence from Damien’s experience, I had the idea that I would be in a stupor for five days. I also envisioned that I would have hardcore hunger pain.

man2andemptyplate

I had an embedded fasting advantage and simultaneous disadvantage in the fact that during my military days I attended and graduated from the Army Ranger School. Small ration amounts and long patrols allowed me to experience true near starvation and the associated pain that goes with it. I remembered those pains and dreaded experiencing them again. I was pleased to find the fast was in no way as stressful as Ranger School.

Ranger School Pic

During the fast I took about 3 liters of water a day and had no other liquid or food of any type. Not a single cheat. The closest I came to opening the glove compartment in the car and seeing a box of Tic-Tacs. I resisted though I had lust in my heart.

Why I did it

Other than being inspired by The Quantified Body podcast, I have been trying to test my food and supplement intake to drop my blood glucose levels. I thought a fast would be a way to see my glucose and ketones in a food free state. And I liked the challenge of it.

What I measured

For the fast I measured:

What I Found

Overall, I found that fasting for five days is not stressful, does not put me into a stupor and my glucose level dropped to a range Damien and his co-fasters reported seeing. As a technique, a water fast yields ketosis like I had never experienced before. I lost 10 lbs. And I had horrible bad breath for four of the days. Here are the details.

Heart Rate Variability

My heart rate variability (HRV) averaged an rMSSD of 44 during the fast and my average over multiple months prior was 50. The lowered period on the graph just prior to the fast was due to travel.

1. HRV&Fasting

Glucose & Ketones

Fasting glucose clearly dropped from an average of 101 down to 69 for days 3, 4 and 5. Of interest is that it took my body two days to adjust.

2. WakingGlucose

It took me the two days to bring my ketones up to a point where they were more plentiful than my dropping glucose. I had three days of the glucose-ketone ratio being under 1.0, which reportedly has a therapeutic effect. This was a great outcome. Here are my afternoon (postprandial) readings:
3. Glucose & Ketones

Weight

Obviously weight was going to drop as I was not eating. I was an average of 192 pre-fast and lost 10 lbs by the end of the fast.

4. Weight

Here is a before and after picture that shows for me what losing 10 lbs looks like. Picture on left was the night before the fast, right the last day of the fast.

Fast Yields Ketosis and Halitosis

Awake

Nine times a day I measured how alert I felt because my story was that I would be in a stupor. A measure of 3 is normal, 2 would be actually yawning. You can see I was yawning tired in the first few days then my body compensated. I was never exhausted.

6. Awake Readings

Hunger

I felt hunger pangs throughout but intermittently. Only once did I have a headache related to the fast which was the end of day 2. Notably day 3 on my awareness of hunger diminished and you can see the jump in scores (higher is less hungry).

5. Hunger Graph Fast

Muse Calm

My Muse calm score seemed to drop off through the fast. I felt calm and good each morning on waking you can see the drop when the fast started. Bears further investigation.

8. MuseCalmFast

Blood Pressure

My diastolic blood pressure was completely unaffected and my sistolic popped up a bit on days 3 & 4.
9. Blood Pressure

Notes On The Experience

My original idea was to have a five day period to focus on the fast and be sequestered away to save energy, but life intruded. I had several social commitments that had been scheduled well before I decided to do the fast to include a Meetup and a charity event.

One significant drawback is my breath was awful. According to Damien and his fellow fasters, this is due to increased acetone that comes out through the breath. When you are discussing deep thoughts at a charity event while spewing breath that can knock a buzzard off a manure wagon you have discovered the downside of fasting.

Anecdotally I felt great when I was focused on a task and was able to get a lot of work done. But when I was interrupted or had a something suddenly come up I experienced fairly hot and palpable irritation. This seemingly lowered ability to handle context switches deserves further study.

This is the most meaningful and impactful experiment I have done. I ended the fast having experienced the fact that our bodies have a deep reserve of nutrients and that eating huge meals three times a day is completely unnecessary. Doing this has raised my interest in finding my own optimal nutrient level. Thanks for Damien for the inspiration. Good times ahead.

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Disappointing Outcome With Bitter Melon Protocol

This is an N of 1 study on a specific supplement that reportedly has the outcome of lowered blood glucose levels. In June of 2015 I went on a ketogenic diet. I was enjoying the benefits of weight loss and increased alertness, but I noticed my blood glucose was creeping up in the daily readings. I wanted to see if I could turn that around and bring the readings lower.

I heard on the Ben Greenfield Fitness podcast that Bitter Melon lowers blood glucose levels. I purchased the supplement and decided to test it. The results were surprising, but not in a fun way.

suprised scientist

My Question

Is Bitter Melon effective for in lowering my blood glucose and should I continue to take it?

What I Did

I took Bitter Melon on a randomized schedule for 20 days, then took it every day for another 14 days. As I did so, I recorded my glucose levels after waking, at 10am, and 3pm each day.

How I Did It

I used a Google Spreadsheet to generate a random “one” or “zero” for each day in the 20 day randomized period. This gave me instructions on whether or not to take the Bitter Melon. After 20 days, I took it every day for 13 days.

The daily dose was two tablets, which is 900mg of the supplement. I excluded readings on days where food intake was outside of a normal range, or something extraordinary was happening like a flight or no sleep.

At the end of the period, I looked at the difference on the randomized days using a TTest. I also looked at the effect on my glucose for the period where I was taking the supplement every day.

What I Learned

I had a disappointing outcome with Bitter Melon protocol. There was no change in the continued climb in my blood glucose levels. This graph shows the period from the beginning of the diet to the end of the Bitter Melon test:

Morning Reads

The period of taking Bitter Melon was from 8/9/2015 onward, so for me it appeared to be ineffective in arresting the upward movement of the glucose levels.

The first measure I looked at was the morning readings based on having taken the supplement the day prior. There was no effect: p=.84. Recall that to have demonstrated a significant difference in the two data sets we are looking  for p<.05.

The second measure was a 10am reading after having taken the pills at around 7am. Doing the TTest comparing the days where I had taken the supplement vs. not there was no effect: p=.25.

The final measure I compared was a measure at 3PM, comparing the days where I had ingested Bitter Melon vs. not. The test showed a significant difference (P=.057), but the result was reversed from what I would expect. The average glucose reading on the days I took Bitter Melon was higher than days I did not take the pills. That is an odd outcome.

Finally, looking at the effect of taking the supplement daily there was no significant change in the morning glucose level taking an intermittent dose versus a daily dose (p=.17).

image (7)

As a result of this analysis I will no longer take Bitter Melon and save myself the money. And the data opens up another line of research. Something is driving my glucose levels upward. I am tracking my food intake and my carbohydrates are very low. I am not eating any processed foods. The next step is to eliminate all supplements and see if the source is there as well as up my fiber levels. One thing is for sure. A “one size fits all” ketogenic diet ripped straight from the podcasts is not the cure all for my physiology. Nor is it probably for yours either.

 

 

How Meetings Go – Physiologically

I have been measuring my rMSSD during work meetings to see what factors impact my performance when engaging face to face with others. I recently had two meetings with the same group of people on the same topic about a week apart. Before each meeting I also took my blood sugar to see if there was any information to be gleaned there. Here are the charts:

Slide1My blood sugar was abnormally high at 135 before the first meeting. I can’t account for it as I had salmon for lunch two hours before. My average rMSSD was much lower at 28.7 which is a reading of high stress. My stress point for rMSSD is 48, when I am below that reading it is an indicator that I am in stress. My experience during the meeting was of being overly excited and I breathed regularly during the meeting.

During the second meeting I was careful about my food choices for the day and had a good blood glucose level of 105. My average rMSSD for the meeting was higher at 38.8. I felt more in the zone in the second meeting physiologically. We were digging into more details in the second meeting and I felt challenged at a few points, and you can see where the reading drops to a very low rMSSD at a few points.

If asked I would have said the first meeting was more successful based on the discussion. And I would have said the second meeting was more challenging. However physiologically the second meeting was far less stressful than the first. When less stressed I imagine my actual performance was better. So my perception of the outcome was very different than the physiological reality.

Next step is to measure outcomes and see if the results correlate with the physiological state occurring during the meetings. I can’t rely on my perception of the situation so further readings will determine outcomes with physiology.

Glucose & Heart Rate Variability

My sister-in-law is a doctor and follows my Heart Rate Variability (HRV) adventures. She suggested that I look at my glucose levels and see how it effects HRV. My first step was to buy a glucose monitor and I was somewhat uncomfortable with the idea of drawing blood daily. A trip to Target to buy an Onsync glucose meter was pretty easy and the blood drawing process is far less uncomfortable than I thought it was.

So I started pulling my glucose each morning when I got up. Immediately afterward I took my HRV focussing on rMSSD using the Polar H7 and Heart Rate Variability Logger. I took a reading for 1:30 with three 30 second readings which I averaged out for the session. While taking the reading I used the Paced Breathing Android App. After I was completed I entered the glucose reading and rMSSD in an excel spreadsheet.

Here is what I found.  Glucose levels have a strong negative correlation (Pearson value of -0.4) with HRV. That means higher blood glucose had a strong relationship with lowered HRV.  That means eat food that jacks your blood sugar and your are less responsive to your environment. Eat candy and be dumber when talking to your boss.

Here is a graph of eight readings:

GlucoseReading

Looking at the figures you can see that generally my glucose level averaged about 104. When I fasted (12 hours of no food) it dropped below 100. The rMSSD was between 55 and 78, all well above the stress line. So my morning readings showed no stress and normal blood sugars. What it also showed was a strong correlation. So measuring before and after daily events will give more information to see if I really am dumber talking to the boss after eating candy.